FCTC EPISODE 245: APRIL 1996 PART 2

Episode 245: April 1996 Part 2

Welcome to the two hundredth and forty-fifth episode of From Crisis to Crisis: A Superman Podcast!  This podcast has a simple premise; examine just about every Superman comic published between Man of Steel #1 in 1986 to Adventures of Superman #649 in 2006 in an informative and hopefully entertaining format.

Mike and Jeff close out cover date April 1996 with only one regular Superman book.  So, this episode is a bit different.  As such, the boys kick things off with some announcements about an upcoming Post Crisis collected edition before moving into a handful of emails that, shockingly, are not three years old.  After that they talk about Superman #110, where the discussion is less argumentative (at least compared to the last episode) and more nuanced in terms of the characterization of Lois and Clark.

Then the boys get into the Hey, Wha’ Happened segment, which is a little longer than usual because they are making up for something they didn’t cover last time.  First up are three more episodes from the third season of Lois and Clark: The New Adventures of SupermanI Now Pronounce You…, Double Jeopardy, and Seconds form a trilogy of episodes that not only feature the return of John Shea as Lex Luthor, but also features frog eating clones.  It is a wild ride where you get two Lois Lanes, Lex with a death ray, and the Lois and Clark premiere of Bibbo!

But seriously…these episodes are the turning point for the show.  A tipping point that goes down, not up.

After that Mike and Jeff cover the Superman Family related comics, but some other select books from elsewhere in the DC Universe.

Below are the covers and select pages from the comics we covered on this episode.

And here is that awesome jam piece discussed in the email section.

And here is the Jerry Siegel eulogy page from Superman #110.

Shows promoted in this episode include:

You can subscribe or listen to the show in a variety of ways. First there is the RSS Feed and then there is the Apple Podcasts link.  You can also find the show on Spotify and the Google Play Store.  Are you on Facebook? Be sure to “like” the official FCTC page, which you can find by clicking on this link.  You can email the show by clicking this link. All questions, concerns, fears, trepidations and cheap shots are welcome.  Also be sure to give us a review over on iTunes and feel free to comment on the show here at the site!

Next Time: The boys begin their look at the cover date May 1996 books with Adventures of Superman #534 and Action Comics #721 in addition to asking Hey, Wha’ Happened in the real world with a look at two episodes from the third season of Lois and Clark as well as the major news event that happened and movies that came out the month the comics they are covering came out.

VIEWS FROM THE LONGBOX EPISODE 270 – THE SUMMER OF 1990 REVISITED

Episode 270 – The Summer of 1990 Revisited

The summer of 1990 was thirty years ago and while it wasn’t the most important year for me and comics it was a pretty big summer for me.  So, I thought it would be fun to trip hammer through the books I read that summer and into the fall (and maybe earlier in the year, because it’s 2020 and rules have no meaning) and get into why I liked them so much.  I also thought it would be fun to bring a friend along for the ride, so Tom Panarese (he of Pop Culture Affidavit and Required Reading With Tom and Stella fame) joins me on this journey through time and nostalgia.

We cover a lot of comics.  Nothing in great detail, but we go through the comics that we read and that meant the most to us.  Topics include; the Robin mini-series, the return of the Joker, Todd McFarlane’s Spider-Man #1, the Alan Grant Demon series, the Superman books that came out that summer, Comics Scene magazine, the Flash, Aliens vs. Predator, and much, much more.  There are also memories of traveling to El Paso, Texas and plenty of tangents along the way.

Below is a gallery of the covers to some of the covers we talked about in this episode.

Thanks again to Tom Panarese for coming out to play.  Be sure to catch the premiere episode of a new/old series on the Fortress of Baileytude Podcasting Network  called Views On…, which will be coming out soon.

Views is available on Apple Podcasts and Spotify.  You can also like the official Views From The Longbox Page over on Facebook.  You can email the show by clicking this link with all questions, concerns, fears, and trepidations.  Also, if you could leave a review over on Apple Podcasts, that would be keen.

Next Time: Alan Middleton stops by to talk about the first five issues of the Vertigo series 100 Bullets.

FCTC EPISODE 244: APRIL 1996 PART 1

Episode 244: April 1996 Part 1

Welcome to the two hundredth and forty-fourth episode of From Crisis to Crisis: A Superman Podcast!  This podcast has a simple premise; examine just about every Superman comic published between Man of Steel #1 in 1986 to Adventures of Superman #649 in 2006 in an informative and hopefully entertaining format.

This time out Mike and Jeff get deeper into 1996 with the cover date April books.  First up is Action Comics #720, which is a huge issue because this is the book where Lois ends the engagement.  It’s right there on the cover.  This book went into several printings.  It was a thing.  The boys have a lively discussion with Mike taking exception to several things Lois says during the course of the issue and Jeff not agreeing with them and while it may sound like they’re fighting, they really aren’t.  Then, in Superman: The Man of Steel #55, the break-up continues and a side character that Mike and Jeff have HATED FROM DAY ONE meets his final fate.  Also, Mike and Jeff are more in agreement over this issue compared to the Action issue.  Then, the boys ask, Hey, Wha’ Happened in the real world and discuss the movies that came out the month these books were published.

Below are the covers and select pages from the comics we covered on this episode.

Shows promoted in this episode include:

You can subscribe or listen to the show in a variety of ways. First there is the RSS Feed and then there is the Apple Podcasts link.  You can also find the show on Spotify and the Google Play Store.  Are you on Facebook? Be sure to “like” the official FCTC page, which you can find by clicking on this link.  You can email the show by clicking this link. All questions, concerns, fears, trepidations and cheap shots are welcome.  You can  follow us on Twitter if you’re into such things!  Also be sure to give us a review over on iTunes and feel free to comment on the show here at the site!

Next Time: The heartbreak continues in Superman #111, which is the only main book the boys will be covering because of how the books were released in 1996.  After that they ask Wha’ Happened: Elsewhere in the DCU with the Superman family books and select DC Comics from cover month April 1996.

OVERLOOKED DARK KNIGHT EPISODE 44 – STARLIN’S BATMAN RUN PART 6: THE CULT PART 2

Episode 44 – Starlin’s Batman Part 6: The Cult Part 2

Welcome to the forty-fourth episode of The Overlooked Dark Knight. The is a non-index index show where the hosts, Andrew Leyland and Michael Bailey, look at Batman comics that rarely, if ever, get talked about.  Back in episode 39 they started a series covering Jim Starlin’s run of Batman and they are going to continue with that until they get through all of his issues, up to and including Batman: The Cult.

Once again, speaking of Batman: The Cult

After two months off Andy and Mike are back to continue their look at the Jim Starlin run on Batman and to finish their look at Batman: The Cult with the third and fourth issues of that series.  The guys talk about the action scenes, the fact that Blackfire is using religion as a means to an end, how the story continues to have the now feeling and why Mike liked the part where Batman beat Blackfire like Blackfire owed him money.

Oh, and there is a fair bit of political talk during the episode.  So…content warning and all that.

Below are the covers and select pages of the comics discussed in this episode.

Andy and Mike want your feedback on this episode so they can read it on an upcoming show!  You even have options in how you leave your feedback.  The most direct way is to leave a comment right here on the site.  You can also send all questions, concerns, fears and trepidations to [email protected].  Then there’ the Facebook page, where you can also leave a Batman related question for Andy and Mike to answer at the beginning of the show.  If you talk about this show on the social medias please include a #overlookeddk so the guys know where to find it.

If you want to subscribe to the show here’s the RSS Feed and the Apple Podcast link.  If you use iTunes please leave us a review.  Not only will we read that on the air like the other feedback but it really helps the show out.  The show is also available on the Google Play Store and Spotify.

Next time: Andy and Mike’s coverage of the Jim Starlin run continues with a fantastic two-parter with a definite eighties vibe.

FCTC EPISODE 243: MARCH 1996 PART 2

Episode 243: March 1996 Part 2

Welcome to the two hundredth and forty-third episode of From Crisis to Crisis: A Superman Podcast!  This podcast has a simple premise; examine just about every Superman comic published between Man of Steel #1 in 1986 to Adventures of Superman #649 in 2006 in an informative and hopefully entertaining format.

Mike and Jeff wrap up cover date March 1996 (which also served as an unofficial team-up month) by looking at three…count them…THREE books.  In Superman #110, the Man of Steel teams up with Plastic Man to solve the mystery of siblings (Tiger and Treasure Hunt) trying to get Superman and Plastic Man to help them stop the other from stealing a weapon.  Turns out this isn’t the real reason and the issue ends on a gag.  Then, in Adventures of Superman #532, Superman teams up with Impulse on a world spanning chase involving a villain that normally fights Superboy.  After that, in Superman: The Man of Tomorrow #4, Superman and Captain Marvel team-up to fight against people that took the demon drug, which was really a means to distract the Wizard Shazam from the fact that his son, Lord Satanus, is in Metropolis.  Finally, in Wha’ Happened: Elsewhere in the DCU, the boys talk about the other Superman related books published this month, as well as select books from the overall DCU.

Fun fact…one of those Elsewhere books talks about a major story beat before the comic it happened in came out.

Below are the covers and select pages from the comics we covered on this episode.

And here are the two Superman related house ads from these issues.

Shows promoted in this episode include:

You can subscribe or listen to the show in a variety of ways. First there is the RSS Feed and then there is the Apple Podcasts link.  You can also find the show on Spotify and the Google Play Store.  Are you on Facebook? Be sure to “like” the official FCTC page, which you can find by clicking on this link.  You can email the show by clicking this link. All questions, concerns, fears, trepidations and cheap shots are welcome.  Also be sure to give us a review over on iTunes and feel free to comment on the show here at the site!

Next Time: Team Up Month continues with Plastic Man and Woozy Winks in Superman #110, Impulse in Adventures of Superman #532, and Captain Marvel and the Wizard Shazam in Superman: The Man of Tomorrow #4.  After that, they get into the Wha’ Happened: Elsewhere in the DCU segment where they talk about the Superman Family books that came out this month and select books from the larger DC Universe.

FCTC EPISODE 242: MARCH 1996 PART 1

Episode 242: March 1996 Part 1

Welcome to the two hundredth and forty-second episode of From Crisis to Crisis: A Superman Podcast!  This podcast has a simple premise; examine just about every Superman comic published between Man of Steel #1 in 1986 to Adventures of Superman #649 in 2006 in an informative and hopefully entertaining format.

Mike and Jeff kick off their coverage of the books with a cover date of March 1996, which was a team-up month that saw Superman teaming up with another hero in each of the five Superman titles.  It was sort of like a then modern version of DC Comics Presents, the Pre-Crisis Superman team up title.

It was a neat concept.

The first book they cover is Action Comics #719, where Superman teams up with Batman to save Lois Lane, who is on the brink of death thanks to the Joker.  Mike has a serious problem with this story for a variety of reasons.  Jeff liked it a lot more than Mike, and the boys go back and forth on this through the whole segment on that issue.  Then, in Superman: The Man of Steel #53, the Spectre comes to Gotham to take care of a Native American spirit that is mad at the Daily Planet because of technology and the Alpha Centurion and his ship might be to blame for this.  Oh, and the Lois is having problems with Clark sub-plot, much to Mike’s chagrin.

After that the boys get into the Hey, Wha’ Happened: Real World segment, starting with three episodes from the third season of Lois and Clark: The New Adventures of Superman.  Those episodes include Never on Sunday, The Dad Who Came in From the Cold, and Tempus Anyone?  Then Jeff goes over what was going on in the real world and what movies were in theaters when this month’s comics were published.

Technical Note: There is a chirping about halfway through the episode that comes and goes.  Mike did everything he could to get rid of it, but he couldn’t quite get all of them.  So…listener beware and all that.

Below are the covers and select pages from the comics we covered on this episode.

Shows promoted in this episode include:

You can subscribe or listen to the show in a variety of ways. First there is the RSS Feed and then there is the Apple Podcasts link.  You can also find the show on Spotify and the Google Play Store.  Are you on Facebook? Be sure to “like” the official FCTC page, which you can find by clicking on this link.  You can email the show by clicking this link. All questions, concerns, fears, trepidations and cheap shots are welcome.  Also be sure to give us a review over on iTunes and feel free to comment on the show here at the site!

Next Time: Team Up Month continues with Plastic Man and Woozy Winks in Superman #110, Impulse in Adventures of Superman #532, and Captain Marvel and the Wizard Shazam in Superman: The Man of Tomorrow #4.  After that, they get into the Wha’ Happened: Elsewhere in the DCU segment where they talk about the Superman Family books that came out this month and select books from the larger DC Universe.

FCTC EPISODE 241 – LOIS AND CLARK SEASON 3: VIRTUALLY DESTROYED AND HOME IS WHERE THE HURT IS

Episode 241 – Lois and Clark Season 3: Virtually Destroyed and Home Is Where The Hurt Is

Welcome to the two hundredth and forty-first episode of From Crisis to Crisis: A Superman Podcast!  This podcast has a simple premise; examine just about every Superman comic published between Man of Steel #1 in 1986 to Adventures of Superman #649 in 2006 in an informative and hopefully entertaining format.

This time out Mike and Jeff do their final stand-alone episode discussing episodes of Lois and Clark: The New Adventures of Superman.  Why is this the final stand-alone episode?  The boys go over that in the first part of the episode where Mike in particular lays out why he can’t spend as much time on the show as they have been.  Then they get into the two episodes that came out around the same time as the issues with a February 1996 cover date.  First up is Virtually Destroyed, where Lois and Clark find themselves trapped in a virtual reality made by the supposed illegitimate son of Lex Luthor.  This happens in and around them talking about the possibility of having children.  Also, Jimmy does some Tae Kwon Do.

It’s not quite as silly as it sounds, but it’s close.

Then, in Home is Where The Hurt Is, we are treated to a Christmas episode where Lois and Clark’s parents both come to Metropolis to celebrate the holidays.  Lois’ dad also brings an android he created to be a companion.  Yeah.  That’s creepy.  Anyway, Mindy Church is expanding her power base, so she has Joey Bermuda create a virus to kill the Man of Steel to get him out of the way.  This actually works, and Clark suddenly finds himself on the edge of death.  Will he survive?

Well, of course he will.  The show went four seasons.  Listen to find out how that happened.

After all that, the boys FINALLY get to the emails that have been piling up for three years.  They’re sorry they took so long.  They’ll try not to let you down again.

Shows promoted in this episode include:

You can subscribe or listen to the show in a variety of ways. First there is the RSS Feed and then there is the Apple Podcasts link.  You can also find the show on Spotify and the Google Play Store.  Are you on Facebook? Be sure to “like” the official FCTC page, which you can find by clicking on this link.  You can email the show by clicking this link. All questions, concerns, fears, trepidations and cheap shots are welcome.  Also be sure to give us a review over on iTunes and feel free to comment on the show here at the site!

Next Time: The boys dive into the first half of the books with a cover date of March 1996 (a.k.a. Team Up Month) by looking at Action Comics #719 and Superman: The Man of Steel #54.  After that becomes the Hey, Wha’ Happened: Real World edition, where Mike and Jeff talk about a few episode of Lois and Clark: The New Adventures of Superman and what was going on in the real world when these books were published.

FCTC EPISODE 240: FEBRUARY 1996 PART 2

Episode 240: February 1996 Part 2

Welcome to the two hundredth and fortieth episode of From Crisis to Crisis: A Superman Podcast!  This podcast has a simple premise; examine just about every Superman comic published between Man of Steel #1 in 1986 to Adventures of Superman #649 in 2006 in an informative and hopefully entertaining format.

Mike and Jeff continue with their look at the Superman books with a cover date of February 1996.  First on the docket is Superman #109, which is a stealth Metropolis Mailbag episode with the twist of an ex-Team Luthor agent wanting revenge on the Man of Steel for ruining his life.  Superman didn’t, but this guy is not acting rationally.  Then, in Adventures of Superman #532 Lori Lemaris, presumed dead mermaid ex-girlfriend of Clark Kent, returns to Metropolis.  The big shock is that she is still alive.  The other shock is that her husband has been playing with magic and is out of control.  Finally, the boys ask, Hey, Wha’ Happened? Comics Edition and look at the Superman Family Books that came out this cover month as well as mentioning some other books from the larger DCU

Below are the covers and select pages from the books covered in this episode.

Podcasts promoted in this episode include:

You can subscribe or listen to the show in a variety of ways. First there is the RSS Feed and then there is the Apple Podcasts link.  You can also find the show on Spotify and the Google Play Store.  Are you on Facebook? Be sure to “like” the official FCTC page, which you can find by clicking on this link.  You can email the show by clicking this link. All questions, concerns, fears, trepidations and cheap shots are welcome.  Also be sure to give us a review over on iTunes and feel free to comment on the show here at the site!

Next Time: The final, standalone Lois and Clark: The New Adventures of Superman episode because of…reasons.  Episodes discussed are Virtually Destroyed and Home is Where The Hurt Is. Plus…YOUR FEEDBACK!

FCTC EPISODE 239: FEBRUARY 1996 PART 1

Episode 239: February 1996 Part 1

Welcome to the two hundredth and thirty-ninth episode of From Crisis to Crisis: A Superman Podcast!  This podcast has a simple premise; examine just about every Superman comic published between Man of Steel #1 in 1986 to Adventures of Superman #649 in 2006 in an informative and hopefully entertaining format.

After only a month (not a bad record for this show) Mike and Jeff are back with a brand, spanking new episode of From Crisis to Crisis!  This time out they begin their examination of the books with a cover date of February 1996.  First up is Action Comics #718, which features a new antagonist (because she’s not quite a villain but isn’t an according to Hoyle hero) named Demolitia.  She’s kind of like Bloodsport without the Vietname or White Supremacy baggage.  She also really hates a weapons manufacturer, which brings her into conflict with Superman and the discussion about that scenes brings some conflict between the shows.  Then, in Superman: The Man of Steel #53, Lex Luthor and the Contessa have a meet cute, Superman fights a guy that looks like Jimmy Olsen mutated into a reptile, and a fight breaks out at Bibbo’s bar, which begins a short plotline where he gets back into the boxing game.  Finally, it’s the segment formerly know as Meanwhile, At The Daily Planet…and is now known as Hey, Wha’ Happened: The Real World, where the boys talk about the real world events and the movies that went down around the time these comics were published.

Below are the covers and selected pages from the comics discussed in this episode.

You can subscribe or listen to the show in a variety of ways. First there is the RSS Feed and then there is the Apple Podcasts link.  You can also find the show on Spotify and the Google Play Store.  Are you on Facebook? Be sure to “like” the official FCTC page, which you can find by clicking on this link.  You can email the show by clicking this link. All questions, concerns, fears, trepidations and cheap shots are welcome.  Also be sure to give us a review over on iTunes and feel free to comment on the show here at the site!

Next Time: The boys wrap up cover date February 1996 with Superman #110 and Adventures of Superman #532, as well as the Superman Family books published that month and a look at the larger DC Universe.

REVIEW – SUPERMAN: THE MAN OF STEEL VOLUME 1 HARDCOVER

Superman- Bookshelf Logo Final

Superman: The Man of Steel Volume 1 Hardcover Review

This book had a strange path to getting published.  Originally it was solicited as Superman: The Man of Steel By John Byrne Omnibus Volume 1 in October 2019 with a release date of July 7, 2020.  The book was going to collect (almost) the entire first year and change of John Byrne’s run on what became the various Superman titles.  That was cancelled and DC solicited another, smaller hardcover collection in March 2020 with the same release date.  This collection, titled Superman: The Man of Steel Vol. 1 HC, cut the omnibus in half.  Then the release date was changed again, and the book finally came out on August 25, 2020.

I will admit that I was disappointed that the omnibus was cancelled.  I will also admit that when it comes to this era of Superman that I have a firm bias even when I am criticizing aspects of it.  So, me wanting an omnibus of that first year is not even remotely surprising.  It’s the opposite of surprising.  It would be surprising if I didn’t want a fat, hardcover collection of books that I already own in variety of formats.

(This isn’t a cry for help.  I realize that me wanting to buy the same story over and over again is a bit odd, but they’re neat to have, I love this era, and if I keep buying it maybe they’ll make more.)

Despite being delivery of this book being delayed by a day and having a nice dent on the upper corner of the book (thanks Amazon) I finally got my copy and had some thoughts on what was in this collection and how it compares to previous collections of these comics.

Let’s begin.

First Impressions

This is a handsome volume.  The front cover of the dust jacket uses the art from the alternate cover of Man of Steel (1986) #1 with literally a new coat of paint.  The original had a blue suit and an orange tie, where this one has a gray suit, a reddish tie, and a more varied texture to the colors on the S symbol.  While it is darker in tone than the cover to the original issue, it actually pops more.  The back cover of the dust jacket likewise repurposes art from the cover of Superman: The Man of Steel Vol. 2, published in October of 2003.  Jerry Ordway is the artist and it is once again given a darker recoloring with a blue background instead of the tan of the original.  The background of this image is a little more washed out and some of the detail is lost, but the main figure looks great with the darker colors.

Under the dust jacket we have more repurposed art.  The front cover is the final page of Man of Steel (1986) #6, minus the dawn or dusk colored background and the thought balloons.  I was actually surprised that they went with this one and not the final page of Man of Steel (1986) #1, which is an oft used shot of Superman taking flight.  It does pop up later.  The back cover is from the splash page of Action Comics #584, again minus word balloons and backgrounds.  Contextually this is an odd choice given this is a Superman that has had his mind switched with a handicapped man and that man was using Superman to tear up real estate, but it’s a bold image and it’s on the back, under the dust jacket.  It’s interesting that there is no copy on either the front or back interior covers, but I’m good with that.  The white backgrounds are also an odd choice.  I’m not sure how I feel about them.

The inside flaps of the dust jacket have images from the splash page of Superman (1987) #1 and the previously mentioned last page of Man of Steel (1986) #1 on them.

From a purely visual standpoint, this is a nice-looking book.  It has a modern feel with the coloring, but since the art is between twenty-four to seventeen years old, it feels right for the era it was published in.  Having Ordway art on the back cover is fitting.  While John Byrne rightly gets most of the acclaim of revamping Superman, Jerry Ordway was there at the beginning and would stay with the Superman books full time until 1993.  I’m happy that whoever designed this gave Jerry his due.

A Look Inside

If you have read the previous trade paperback series, there isn’t anything new about the interiors.  After a title and dedication page, we have an essay that serves as an introduction called Superman: A Personal View by John Byrne.  This was originally published on the inside back cover of Man of Steel (1986) #1, so it’s a bit odd that the year 1991 is given next to the author credit.  From what I could tell nothing had been added from the original in 1986, but this is a minor quibble.

Unlike volumes 1-6 of the series of trade paperbacks titled Superman: The Man of Steel, which were published between 2003 and 2008, this collection puts the cover of the issue before the issue instead of having a cover gallery at the back.  I always prefer this.  I realize an argument could be made that not having the covers before the issue gives the reader a more streamlined reading experiences, but cover galleries in the back mean the reader can skip them and I always think seeing the cover before the issue is better.  Again, a very minor quibble, but one I apparently felt the need to mention.

After issues 1-6 of Man of Steel (1986) the placement of the comics matches that of Volume 2 and a bit of Volume 3 of the previously mentioned Superman: The Man of Steel trade paperback series.  Like those volumes, it does not reprint them in release order.  Instead, it puts them together more in story order.  You have Superman (1987) #1, followed by Action Comics #584, followed by Superman (1987) #2.  After that, you have issues 424 and 425 of Adventures of Superman are slotted in, which reads just fine except for the minor hiccup of there being a shot of Clark talking to the villain of Action Comics #584 in the pages of Adventures of Superman #424.  Originally, in the single issues Adventures 424 came out before the Action issue.  This is the sort of thing that you’d really have to be paying attention to notice.

If this sounds pedantic…it’s because it is.  I’m mentioning it purely out of wanting to compare this book to the previous version of this collection.

And…to be a bit of a pedant.

I mean, I’m doing a deep dive into a hardcover comic book collection.  This shouldn’t be shocking.

From there the books are in the same order as the Superman: The Man of Steel trades and ends on a fun but not terribly deep team-up with Etrigan the Demon, which has the “because of time travel or something this story never happened” trope Byrne plays with from time to time.  Then we are treated to the Why Superman? Why Today? essay by Ray Bradbury.  This has appeared in most trade paperback collections of Man of Steel (1986) going back to the first time the series got a proper collected edition in 1987.  Once again, the date 1991 is given and I am curious where that date is coming from.  One of the versions of that trade had a mostly black cover that I thought was put out in 1992 but it’s possible it came out the year before.  Release dates on non-first printings can be tricky.

Next are reprints of the introductions from volumes 2 and 3 of the Superman: The Man of Steel trades.  The first, which originally appeared in volume 2, is Reinventing The Wheel by Marv Wolfman, which recounts his experiences writing Superman before the reboot and his part in the revamp of 1986.  This is followed by what was originally titled Introduction in volume 3 but here looks like it’s called The Adventures of Superman.  Either way, it’s written by Jerry Ordway, who, like Wolfman, talks about his experiences with Superman before he started drawing the character and his thoughts on the stories that were reprinted in volume 3 of the 2003 trade series.

Finally, we have the covers from the first three volumes of the Superman: The Man of Steel trade series that I apparently can’t shut up about as well as some pages from Who’s Who: Update ’87.  The pages included here, with one notable exception, were reprinted in volumes 2 and 9 of the Superman: The Man of Steel trade series.  Amazing Grace, Bizarro, Bloodsport, Lex Luthor, Krypton and Kryptonite, Lois Lane, Magpie, and Metallo were included in those volumes.  For some reason, the people that put this collection together threw in Host (a.k.a Mummy Rocket Boots, and if you get that reference, thank you for listening to From Crisis to Crisis).  I had to check and double check that, but yeah…the previous collections did not have Host in them and it’s kind of weird that it was included here since those issues of Superman (1987) are not in this book.

I’m not complaining.  It’s just odd.

Final Thoughts

While I would have preferred the omnibus they initially dangled before us, this is a very well put together hardcover.  The coloring is a bit dark in places, but that doesn’t distract from the art or the writing.  If you are a completist, like me, then you need to get this book.  If you want a nice hardcover to put on the shelf, you need to get this book.  If you have never read these series and don’t feel like chasing down the previous trade paperback series, then you need to get this book.  It is a wonderful introduction to the Post Crisis adventures of Superman and is a well put together package.

Currently there is an Amazon listing for Volume 2 of this series, which looks like it collects the rest of the original omnibus.  I have already pre-ordered my copy and I encourage you to do the same if you can.  I realize that these things can be cancelled at a moment’s notice, but fingers crossed that the second volume comes out.