COLLECTED EDITIONS – SUPERMAN VOL. 2: ENDGAME

(Collected Editions is a listing of the various trade paperbacks, hardcovers, omnibuses, etc. that are in my Superman collection.  The goal is to not only inventory my collection of trades, hardcovers, etc. but also to display said collection and produce something resembling a resource for other Superman readers, collectors and fans.)

Superman Vol. 2 Endgame A Superman Vol. 2 Endgame BNuts and Bolts

  • Released on January 10, 2001
  • Original price $14.95
  • 176 pages
  • Cover by Ed McGuinness and Cam Smith

Contents

  • The End from Superman: Y2K #1
  • Whatever Happened to the City of Tomorrow? from Superman (Vol. 2) #154
  • AnarchY2Knowledge from Adventures of Superman #576
  • Thirty Minutes to Oblivion… from Superman: The Man of Steel #98
  • Sacrifice for Tomorrow from Action Comics #763

Notes

  • This one brings back memories.
  • As I mentioned in the notes for Superman Vol. 1: No Limits! the new creative teams that came on to the Superman books when Eddie Berganza took over as editor didn’t want the books to be as connected as they were during the previous administration.  That did not stop them from occasionally doing an event crossover to bring all four of the Superman titles together.
  • For those of you that were either too young or just plain forget/blocked it from your mind there was a bit of apprehension as we approached New Year’s Eve in 1999.  The fear stemmed from the fact some people believed that computers couldn’t handle the clock turning from 1999 to 2000 and that this would at best cause some problems with your bank account and at worst cause nuclear missiles to launch and the world to end.
  • So when you combine a desire to do a crossover that ties into all four Superman titles together with tapping into a real world hysteria and add wanting to give the world Superman inhabits a new coat of paint for good measure…well, then you get something like Superman: Y2K.
  • For the record the creators produced an exciting story that looked both to the past and the future both in terms of setting and of characters.  Brainiac 13 may seem kind of silly on the surface but in all honesty it is a natural progression of the character as he stood in 1999.
  • It is no surprise that the writers were able to work so well together on this.  Stuart Immonen (who was plotting Adventures of Superman) and Mark Schultz (who was writing Superman: The Man of Steel) were both veteran Superman writers at this point and had been through a few crossovers with the character.  Joe Kelly (who was on Action Comics) and Jeph Loeb (the writer on Superman) both spent time on the X-titles over at Marvel, so they were hip to crossovers as well.  Everyone knew how to play nice with each other or at least that’s how it felt as a reader.  I have no idea what was going on behind the scenes.
  • This story introduced the futuristic Metropolis that I had to put up with for about four or five years.  I wasn’t a fan of making the city where Superman lived into a place with food synthesizers and flying cars.  It just never sat right with me.  While on the surface it seems kind of obvious that Man of Tomorrow should live in the City of Tomorrow it flew in the face of the thing I always thought was vital to Superman and that is he should be this amazing thing in a somewhat realistic setting.  When everything is just as awesome as he is I think it lessens how unique Superman is.  This is purely a personal reaction to the change and has nothing to do with the quality of work the creators that dealt with it produced.
  • Another thing I mentioned in the notes for the previous volume in this series is that sometimes issues of a given series would not be included in these trades.  This trend continues in Endgame.
  • Superman: The Man of Steel #97 and Action Comics #762  were the two books that followed Superman: Y2K if you are going by the Triangle Numbers.  They were left out of this collection but in all honesty it makes sense.  Both of these issues had stories that took place before the events of Y2K.  If you were reading the books from week to week (like I was back in 1999) it didn’t seem too jarring.  If you were reading them altogether I can see where having two issues worth of flashbacks would bring the overall narrative to a abrupt stop.
  • So sometimes leaving books out of the trade actually ends up improving the reading experience.
  • For the sake of clarity I will say again that those issues are not bad by any stretch of the imagination.  They just didn’t flow well with the crossover.
  • The computer generated Brainiac 13 that appeared in this story was a big deal in 1999.  It probably wouldn’t be today.
  • Electric Blue Superman makes an appearance in this story as well, which is kind of awesome in a really weird way.
  • There is a really weird thing done with Superman in this issue that is, to my memory, never talked about again.  I can’t wait for Jeff and I to get to this story so we can talk about that.

To follow this particular line of trades follow the rest of the books in the series…

DC HEROES (MAYFAIR GAMES) – SUPERGIRL PRE-CRISIS

DC Heroes  was a role-playing game published by Mayfair Exponential Game Systems.  Three editions of the game were released between 1985 and 1993.  Superman was the subject of two sourcebooks in addition to appearing in other sourcebooks and gaming modules.  This series is meant to showcase the entries from those sourcebooks as well as Superman’s appearances in other areas of the game.

Supergirl (Pre-Crisis)

  • Originally presented in Superman Sourcebook First Edition (1987)
  • Written by Steve Crow and Chris Mortika

Mayfair- Supergirl A Mayfair- Supergirl B

WHO’S WHO CLASSIC – METALLO (PRE-CRISIS)

Welcome to another installment of Who’s Who Classic, a regular feature here at the Fortress where every Monday I will present an entry from the original series of Who’s Who comics that DC published between 1984 and 1988.  Superman was well represented in those series and I wanted to share the entries with you just in case you have never seen them.  Today’s entry is Metallo Pre-Crisis)!

Metallo A(originally published in Who’s Who: The Definitive Directory of the DC Universe #15, May, 1986)

Remember that you can click on the images to make them larger.

DC COSMIC CARDS – MAXIMA

Another Friday, another set of scans from the DC Cosmic Cards set.

Cosmic Cards- Maxima A Cosmic Cards Maxima BMaxima is a really odd character.  While she was dangerous I never really considered her to be a villain.  She always struck me as someone with a different set of morals which put her at odds with Superman.  They tried to make her an anti-hero throughout the nineties and while it was always a valiant effort I don’t think she gelled with most people.  I always liked her but I am often in the minority about such things.

More to follow…

COLLECTED EDITION – SUPERMAN VOL. 1: NO LIMITS!

(Collected Editions is a listing of the various trade paperbacks, hardcovers, omnibuses, etc. that are in my Superman collection.  The goal is to not only inventory my collection of trades, hardcovers, etc. but also to display said collection and produce something resembling a resource for other Superman readers, collectors and fans.)

Superman Vol. 1 No Limites A Superman Vol. 1 No Limits BNuts and Bolts

  • Released on November 8, 2000
  • Original price $14.95
  • 208 Pages
  • Cover by Mike McKone and Jimmy Palmiotti

Contents

  • We’re Back! from Superman (Vol. 2) #151
  • Krypton Lives from Superman: The Man of Steel #95
  • Deadline U.S.A. from Superman (Vol. 2) #152
  • Something Borrowed, Something Blue from Adventures of Superman #574
  • “,,,Never-Ending Battle…” from Action Comics (Vol. 1) #760
  • Home from Superman: The Man of Steel #96
  • For a Thousand Years… from Action Comics (Vol. 1) #761
  • Say Goodbye from Superman (Vol. 2) #153
  • Bridge the Past and Future from Superman: The Man of Steel #97

Notes

  • This is the first volume in an interesting series.  There was no official name for it, like the Superman: The Man of Steel trades.  It was just Superman Volume Whatever: Insert Title Here.  It’s kind of strange but when you consider that most Superman trades up until this point weren’t part of a series it is rather novel.
  • The stories reprinted in this book were, for the most part, the kick off to a new era of Superman.  Eddie Berganza began editing the Superman titles in late 1999 and brought in some new creators to reinvigorate the Man of Steel.  As much as I love the previous administration the books needed a kick in the pants.  While Mark Schultz stayed on as writer of Superman: The Man of Steel and Stuart Immonen stayed on Adventures of Superman for a brief period the other books received brand new creators.
  • Jeph Loeb, fresh off the success of Superman: For All Seasons, took over Superman while Joe Kelly, best known by this point for writing the first couple of years of Deadpool, began writing Action Comics.
  • It was a pretty exciting time and each writer tackled a different aspect of the Man of Steel.  Superman was the flagship title and was very straight ahead with the action and story.  Superman: The Man of Steel focused on Superman’s Kryptonian side and had more of a science fiction feel to it.  Action Comics was the…well, it was the actiony title.  Adventures of Superman focused more on the supporting cast and the people of Metropolis.
  • At least that’s how it started and for the most part it stayed that way.
  • Once again the order in which the stories appear in the trade becomes a source of slight confusion.  At the time the Superman titles were linked by the Triangle Numbering System and from what I understand the creative teams that were working on these issues wanted to do away with that and in re-reading these books years later you can REALLY tell.
  • If you had read these books as they were coming out the proper Triangle order would have been Superman #151 followed by Adventures of Superman #573 followed by Superman: The Man of Steel #95 followed by Action Comics #760 and for the most part that was the way the books were released for the next several months.
  • Now usually I prefer when they reprint books in the release order but given that the creators did not want to work together like the original Never Ending Battle crew the trade flows a lot better as a collection with how the issues were put together.
  • The seeds of Our Worlds at War were planted in the Superman issues reprinted in this trade.
  • Mike McKone had a very short stint on Superman, which was a shame because his take on the character was awesome.

To follow this particular line of trades follow the rest of the books in the series…

HOUSE ADS – SUPERMAN IN 1971

As a rule I try to only post house ads that I have scanned myself from my own collection.  There have been times in the past that I have poached images from Google Search for a post but for the most part I think it is more personal to scan the stuff I have.  It’s kind of the point of this blog.  There are plenty of Superman sites out there, most importantly the Superman Homepage, that cover the day to day news, reviews, rumors and reports about the Man of Steel but I wanted to showcase my love for the character and to post the stuff that I like about him and would want to see and read about.

Scanning stuff that’s mine can present some problems like when the source material I am scanning isn’t in the best of condition.  Recently I read through my thoroughly whipped copy of Superman (Vol. 1) #233 and stumbled across this ad.

Ad- Superman in 1971 1B Several people posted this ad around the beginning of the year (2013 for you future people) and I remember seeing those posts, remembering how much I loved this ad and thinking, “Hey, I’d love to post that over at the Fortress.” So when I came upon it in my reading my first thought was, “Awesome!  I can finally put that up on the site!” which led to my second thought which was, “Holy crap, this book is in bad shape, I hope it will survive the process.”  It did or I guess I should say it was in as bad a shape after the scanning as it was before.  The only problem was there is a second part to this ad and try as I might the scan I made from my copy of Superman #233 just didn’t look all that good.  No amount of creative cropping and adjusting made it look like something I would want to post here.

Luckily I also had a copy of Action Comics (Vol. 1) #396, which also contained this ad and that book was in much better shape so I was able to not only scan the second page but get a better scan of the first.

Ad- Superman in 1971 1A Ad- Superman in 1971 2 I don’t know why the coloring on the first version of the ad looks different from the second but I was glad to be able to find another version that looked a bit better than the first.  Call it whatever you want…me wanting to be a perfectionist, me having high standards, me having some sort of OCD meltdown…whatever the reason (probably all of them) I was happy to have two relatively clean scans to post.

Then, while grabbing some comics from the collection I realized I had a copy of the Superman #233 Millennium Edition.  For those that don’t know or don’t remember DC spent like two years putting out reprints of their most historic books around the start of the 2000’s to mark the fact that we were moving into a new century and millennium.  Superman got a bunch of these, including the previously mentioned Superman #233 and I pulled it out to read through and remind myself how this reprint looked.  Imagine my surprise and sheer delight that not only did they reprint both stories from the issue but the two page ad as well.

Ad- Superman in 1971 Clean 1 Ad- Superman in 1971 Clean 2So there you have it…three different scans of one ad and two different scans of another to compare and contrast and feed into my need to be a completist!

In all seriousness while the first part of the ad is awesome the second part is what makes it so special.  The Superman books were going through their first major revamp in late 1970 and to see that DC was promoting that revamp makes me smile.  It would have been easy enough to say, “Hey, there are big changes going on with Superman!” but to go through a short history of the character and then highlight all of the different Superman related titles and give a short blurb on what was happening in those books is just neat and a good example of cross promotion.

For the record the main story in Superman #233 is one of my all time favorite Superman stories.  It was one of the first Superman comics I read (in the pages of Superman: From the ’30s to the ’70s) and in terms of writing and art it is just awesome.

Also for the record it was nice to find a Superman House Ad that was from before 1987.  I love the ads I have scanned but at the same time I really need to hunt down some ads from the seventies and early eighties as well for the sake of variety.

Finally, I REALLY need to track down a new copy of Superman #233.

DC HEROES (MAYFAIR GAMES) – LOIS LANE EARTH-1

DC Heroes  was a role-playing game published by Mayfair Exponential Game Systems.  Three editions of the game were released between 1985 and 1993.  Superman was the subject of two sourcebooks in addition to appearing in other sourcebooks and gaming modules.  This series is meant to showcase the entries from those sourcebooks as well as Superman’s appearances in other areas of the game.

Lois Lane (Earth-1)

  • Originally presented in Superman Sourcebook First Edition (1987)
  • Written by Steve Crow and Chris Mortika

Mayfair- Earth 1 Lois Lane A Mayfair- Earth 1 Lois Lane B

WHO’S WHO CLASSIC – BRAINIAC (POST CRISIS)

Welcome to another installment of Who’s Who Classic, a regular feature here at the Fortress where every Monday I will present an entry from the original series of Who’s Who comics that DC published between 1984 and 1988.  Superman was well represented in those series and I wanted to share the entries with you just in case you have never seen them.  Today’s entry is Brainiac (Post Crisis)!

Brainiac II(originally published in Who’s Who’s Update ’88 #1, August 1988)

Remember that you can click on the images to make them larger.

COSMIC CARDS – PARASITE

Another Friday, another set of scans from the DC Cosmic Cards set.

Cosmic Cards Parasite A Cosmic Cards Parasite BI always thought it was interesting that this version of the Parasite not only started life green but also as a Firestorm villain.  It was kind of amusing in 1991 when the Superman people seemingly said, “You know what?  He’s ours again.”  Not that I have ever been the biggest Parasite fan.  I recognize his place in the pantheon of Superman villains but he’s never done that much for me.

I still like the card though.