FCTC EPISODE 155: FCTC MAILBAG…AUGUST 2013 EDITION

Episode 155: FCTC Mailbag – August 2013 Edition

Welcome to the one hundred and fifty fifth episode of From Crisis to Crisis: A Superman Podcast!  This podcast has a simple premise; examine just about every Superman comic published between Man of Steel #1 in 1986 to Adventures of Superman #649 in 2006 in an informative and hopefully entertaining format.

Part index.  Part commentary.  Part history lesson.  All podcast.

After a long and bumpy road Mike and Jeff are back.

It’s been awhile and the boys know that.  They both apologize but this time real life really slapped one of them in the face so it took some time to get back to recording.  Instead of jumping back in with the comics Mike and Jeff thought they would take this time to explain their absence, go over some upcoming Post Crisis collected editions, offer a few theories on how DC could include in the next few volumes of the SUPERMAN: THE MAN OF STEEL series and then spend some time catching up on the e-mail.  Think of this as the boys getting back in the swing of thing.

Oh, quick heads up…there is MAN OF STEEL (as in the move) talk during the episode, so consider this your spoiler warning.

Mike and Jeff would like to thank everyone for coming back and being so understanding about why they were gone so long.

You can subscribe to the show in two ways. First there is the RSS Feed and there is also the iTunes link.

If you want to comment on the show or contact the hosts you can always private message Mike and Jeff, at the Superman Homepage, leave comments here or at the Homepage or here or email them by clicking this link.  All questions, concerns, fears, trepidations and cheap shots are welcome.

Next time: We present some LOIS AND CLARK: THE NEW ADVENTURES OF SUPERMAN talk as we recorded it months ago before the format change and want to still release it.

THE BEST LAID PLANS…

Some time ago I was looking through my news feed on Facebook and saw that writer Paul Kupperberg was selling some of his comic books and comic book related items on eBay.  Two of these items were the instructions to the 1974 releases of the Aurora Superman and Superboy model kits.  If my research is correct the original release of these models happened in 1964 and when they put them out again in ’74 they included a five page comic book story featuring Superman or Superboy (depending on the model) along with the instructions on how to put the model together.  So I bid on the instructions and eventually won the auctions.  It was pretty dang cool.

My original plan was to get the instructions, scan them and post them here.  My thinking was that these instructions were not only neat artifacts from the Bronze Age but also neat artifacts from the Bronze Age with fantastic creative teams.  The Superman instructions had a story written by Marv Wolfman with art by Curt Swan and Frank Giacoia while the Superboy instructions also had a story written by Wolfman with art by Dave Cockrum.  When the package arrived and I actually got to read the stories and look through the instructions it became apparent that scanning them page by page was not going to be an option.  The way these instructions were printed the spine was extremely rigid and would not bend.  Now I am not overly anal-retentive about my collectibles but I didn’t want to trash these things as they are probably the only ones I will ever own.  I was a little bummed by this because not only do you have the instructions on how to build the models and not only do you have these fun little stories but one of the pages was designed to be placed behind the model to mimic the box art/covers.

Oh well…that’s how these things work out from time to time.  As the Rolling Stones once sang you can’t always get what you want.  I will have to settle for posting the covers, which are still pretty bad ass in their own right.

Auroa Superman Instructions Aurora Superboy InstructionsFun fact: Jerry Ordway used the box art from the Superman model as his inspiration to the cover of 1990’s Superman #50.

Superman (Vol. 2) #050 OriginalAnother fun fact: I didn’t realize the first fun fact until just a few years ago when a listener pointed it out to Jeffrey Taylor and I after we discussed this issue on From Crisis to Crisis.  I feel a bit thick headed about that too because I bought a newer version of the model in 2003 and never put two and two together.

Sometimes I can’t see the forest for the trees.  I’m still kicking myself about this.

Anyway…enjoy the covers!  And thanks to Paul Kupperberg for selling these on eBay.  They have gone to what I like to think is a good home.

WHO’S WHO CLASSIC – BLACKROCK

Welcome to another installment of Who’s Who Classic, a regular feature here at the Fortress where every Monday I will present an entry from the original series of Who’s Who comics that DC published between 1984 and 1988.  Superman was well represented in those series and I wanted to share the entries with you just in case you have never seen them.  Today’s entry is Blackrock!

Blackrock(originally published in Who’s Who: The Definitive Directory of the DC Universe #3, May 1985)

My buddies Shag and Rob covered this entry on their most excellent podcast Who’s Who: The Definitive Podcast of the DC Universe.  You can check out the episode Blackrock was featured in by clicking on this link.

Remember that you can click on the images to make them larger.

COMICS SCENE (1987) #1 ARTICLE – JOHN BYRNE INTERVIEW

Presented today is an interview with John Byrne from Comics Scene #1 (1987).  I did not read this interview when it was first published as I wouldn’t discover Comics Scene until the second issue, so when I finally got around to buying some back issues of the magazine a few years ago this was a real treat to find.  The eleven year old me that was still in the very early months of collecting comics would have loved this article.

Like a lot.

Comics Scene 01 Byrne A Comics Scene 01 Byrne B Comics Scene 01 C Comics Scene 01 D Comics Scene 01 ESpeaking as someone that is trying to learn all he can about the Post Crisis era of Superman this interview was a great find.  It provides a real insight into where Byrne was on the Superman titles at the time and where he was about to go.  It also deals with the backlash his revamp was still receiving at the time that oddly enough (and sadly) has not really ended.  All in all a fine interview and a nice artifact from that time and place.

WHO’S WHO CLASSIC – BLACKBRIAR THORN

Welcome to another installment of Who’s Who Classic, a regular feature here at the Fortress where every Monday I will present an entry from the original series of Who’s Who comics that DC published between 1984 and 1988.  Superman was well represented in those series and I wanted to share the entries with you just in case you have never seen them.  Today’s entry is Blackbriar Thorn!

Blacbriar Thorn(originally published in Who’s Who: The Definitive Directory of the DC Universe #2, April 1985)

My buddies Shag and Rob covered this entry on their most excellent podcast Who’s Who: The Definitive Podcast of the DC Universe.  You can check the episode Blackbriar Thorn was featured in by clicking on this link.

Remember that you can click on the images to make them larger.

DIRECT CURRENTS 1997 PREVIEW

Direct Currents 1997 A In 1997 (I would love to tell you exactly when but my memory is not that good) DC put out a one shot edition of Direct Currents to promote the books coming out that year.  As the cover above suggests it was a freebie and I remember devouring the thing when I found it at Titan Games and Comics the week it came out.  I loved and continue to love this sort of thing.  Anyway, several of the pages were devoted to the Superman and Superman related titles.  It was an interesting time for the Man of Steel.  Superboy, Steel, Supergirl and Superboy and the Ravers made up the “Superman Family” titles while there were four monthly Superman books (Superman, Adventures of Superman, Action Comics and Superman: The Man of Steel) and one quarterly book (Superman: The Man of Tomorrow).  It was also around the time that Superman’s powers and costume were completely revamped, which was somewhat controversial at the time and is not remembered fondly today.

By most people.

I am rather fond of it myself.

Say what you will about the Electric Blue era…it made the national news and got people talking.  I used to be rather down on it myself but given some of the eras and events that have come since then it looks pretty good by comparison.

Or I could be looking back with rose colored glasses.  We’ll see what we’ll see when Jeffrey and I get to that era on From Crisis to Crisis.  Until then enjoy the scans.

Direct Currents 1997 B

Direct Currents 1997 C Direct Currents 1997 D Direct Currents 1997 E